Tech

Richard Liu, CEO of JD.com, has not been charged in the United States, but people in China are still weighing his case

Richard Liu will not face charges of sexual assault in the United States, but the technical billionaire faces a renewed trend of public scrutiny at home in China. Minnesota prosecutors said on Friday they would not charge Liu, chief executive of China’s e-commerce giant JD.com (JD), who was arrested in August on suspicion of rape. Liu’s case has taken over China, where the founders of the billionaire company have a high profile. Social media users began to appear in large numbers around the prosecutor’s announcement and Liu responded. The business leader, named Liu Qiangdong, said in a statement that the plaintiffs’ decision “proves that I have not breached any law.” He then apologized for his “interactions” with the young woman who accused him of rape, saying his actions harmed his family and his wife. Founder of JD.com Richard Liu with his wife Zhang Zetian. Liu says his actions in the United States “have hurt my family very much, especially my wife.” Many users said that while Liu, 45, has not been accused, it is still worth censoring his wife Zhang Zetian. “Liu Qiangdong is not guilty, that is the legal provision, but there is morality behind the law,” he said, “as a public figure, he must have higher demands for his words and actions.” An outlet for the Women’s Rights Organization with the support of the ruling Communist Party of China. Zhang, 25, is a popular figure in China. Before she met Liu, she gained Internet fame when her image became stuck in a cup of tea with milk, giving her the nickname “Milk Tea Sister”. Zhang was not available for comment. A fellow technology fellow calls for “harmless” work People on Weibo, a Chinese Twitter-like social media platform, have questioned the findings of a month-long investigation by police and prosecutors for Liu. Some users suggested damaged his reputation irreparably. But there were others who defended him, including one technical businessman. “Sexual abuse will not be a pity for the founder of JD.com,” wrote Li Guoqing, co-founder of Dangdang.com. “It was not sexual abuse, it was just sex outside of marriage, harmless to shareholders and employees.” “It was not an affair outside of marriage, just sex, or little influence on his wife,” he said in a letter criticizing criticism from other users. Dangdang quickly distanced himself from Li’s remarks, posting a statement on his official account at Webbo saying he was not playing any meaningful role in managing the company. Dangdang acquired a subsidiary of China’s HNA Group in April. Liu said in his statement that he felt “deep regret and regret” and hoped that his wife would accept “my sincere apology”. “I will continue to try in all possible ways to reform the impact on my family and to fulfill my responsibilities as a husband.” The rebound of JD Battered shares The allegations against Liu have affected the price of his company’s shares for several months. NASDAQ shares on Friday rose 6% on Friday after prosecutors rejected charges, but it has fallen more than 30% since his arrest. Like many other Chinese stocks, they have been under pressure from concerns about a slowing US economy and trade war with the United States. After news of the arrest of Richard Liu in China, hundreds of millions of people participated in the shooting of his own police on social media. Liu’s case was particularly important to JD because of the power he had as founder. Owns a large majority of the voting rights of the company, giving it control over key decisions. He was CEO in Minneapolis in August for joining the doctoral program in business administration at the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. His follower, a Chinese woman, was studying at the university. Minnesota prosecutors said they found “deep proof problems” that would have made it difficult to build a criminal case against Liu. The Chinese executive authority asserts that sex with the young woman was consensual. The 21-year-old student said at the time of the alleged assault that Liu raped her in her apartment outside the campus after a group dinner. Liu was arrested the same night, but the police allowed him to go the next day without being charged or requested bail. He soon returned to China after his release, with millions of Webbo users sharing a police hideout dressed in orange prison clothes. The young lawyer said she planned to pursue a civil suit against Liu.

Tags

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Close